SMARTGUT: MICROBIOME TESTING

I recently participated in the pilot test for Ubiome‘s new clinical microbiome test.  I had no overt stomach issues (although I do now, long story…).  I was doing this mainly to assess the health of my gut bacteria.  They took 900 healthy people and established a reference range (the science on the gut microbiota is still nascent).  Any bacteria outside of the 99th percentile was considered abnormal.  I had four abnormal bacteria: Butyrivibrio crossotus, Dialister invisus, Lactobacillus, and Ruminococcus albus.  All four were on the low side.

Lactobacillus is found in yogurt, so I am consuming more of that.  They recommended lactobacillus plantarum for Ruminococcus albus, and a lower carb diet to increase Butyrivibrio crossotus.  At this point I am doing neither of the last two recommendations.  But I can’t get enough yogurt…

Attached is the report:

uBiome SmartGut™ Report – 2178228b-6fee-47ac-bdeb-2bd898194b46

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3 comments

  1. Hi,

    I have at least a dozen smart gut results and about 20 ubiome kits, many that overlap. I think your results look pretty typical based on the data they published in their PLOS paper. About 30% of the “healthy cohort” report not having any of the bacteria you are missing so I would say you are okay.

    Also, you might want to censor your reports since they contain your birthday.

    Cheers.

    1. thanks for the reply. Are all of the smart gut results yours? Any way you could share a de-identified result? How could 30% of the healthy cohort not have those bacteria if those bacteria are outside of the 99th percentile?

      1. I have at least 12 smart gut results and about 20 normal ubiome results with about 10 crossover. I cannot easily share the results but you are free to email me.

        > How could 30% of the healthy cohort not have those bacteria if those bacteria are outside of the 99th percentile?

        Good question. I wonder the same thing and have emailed the authors but have received no response yet. Currently writing up a paper about this. You can see my results for yourself.

        I looked at Butyrivbrio crossotus, one of your lows. 88% of the cohort has none of this bacteria. I used this in excel =COUNTIF(Table1[Butyrivibrio crossotus],”<0.000001")/COUNT(Table1[Butyrivibrio crossotus])

        Paper here: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0176555

        Data here: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0176555.s003

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